EARLY TRANSISTOR HISTORY AT

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

Mary Anne Potter

 

Oral History Mary Anne Potter

(Continued)

 

Some lots had very peculiar rainbow effects on them that could not be removed. The surface concentration after boron diffusion was substantially out of control on some slices and fine for others. In the end, we discovered that even a small touch with tweezers to the platinum boxes resulted in tiny pinholes in the platinum. There was no way to load the carriers and then place them in the boxes without using tweezers. After at least of week, maybe longer, of trying to teach operators not to allow their tweezers to touch the boxes, we gave up and went back to our old, messy BBr3. One of our planners was given the chore to collect all of the platinum boxes and to arrange for metal reclaim so that TI could recover some of its investment. I learned that good ideas and good test results in a pilot line do not necessarily equate to success in production. A very useful thing to know and remember.

 

Even though the IC days of the 60s were essentially pioneer days for IC fabrication and design, the basics are still used today. Certainly the facilities, the equipment, the sources, the chemicals, the materials, and the analytical equipment are much more sophisticated.

 

 

 

 

Potter Oral History, Page 8

 

 

 

 

 

Oral History Mary Anne Potter

(Continued)

 

 

 

The upper photo is from an Aug 1962 TI product catalog this is the type of early integrated circuit described by Mary Anne. The lower photo is from a mid-60s inhouse TI handout that was provided to manufacturing employees; here you can see the scale of the diffusion furnaces used to introduce the required impurities into the silicon slices.

 

 

COPYRIGHT 2002 by Jack Ward. All Rights Reserved. http://www.transistormuseum.com/

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