EARLY TRANSISTOR HISTORY AT MOTOROLA

“SEMINAR SHENANIGANS” by Ralph Greenburg   

 

Curator’s Introduction:  In this article, Ralph highlights a few interesting “Motorola Semiconductor Applications Seminars” that stand out from the many seminars he attended.  (Note: The complete Ralph Greenburg Oral History can be found at the Transistor Museum™ homepage).        

 

 

Seminar Shenanigans

 

During my years with Motorola Semiconductor Application Engineering I participated in a hundred or so technical seminars.  There were a few that were a little different than the norm.

 

California Capers

 

A common seminar trip was to the LA area.  These were called the “Two-a-day”.  Hollywood in the morning, some nearby city in the afternoon.  One time Jack Takesuye, Jim McCall and myself did our stuff in Hollywood then it was box lunch on the freeway on to Anaheim.  Our driver was John Vajda one of the salesmen who like most of this breed loved to talk.  The trouble was that John liked to make eye contact during his monologues.  This was fine in the office but to look at us in the back seat while hurtling down a freeway at 60 mph was a bit scary.  So while Jack, Jim and I nervously nibbled on ham sandwiches and checked to see which car we would run into John somehow stayed in the proper lane, at a safe distance from other cars, while looking at us and not at the road.  We made it to the Anaheim auditorium with nary a bent fender and in total awe of John’s driving skills.  I wonder if he had a third eye on the back of his head.

 

After the seminar the salesman took us to the Cockatoo Inn for drinks and dinner.  While we were sipping draft beer Jack went to the Men’s Room.  He soon came hurrying back and said “Stop drinking the beer”.  Someone asked “Why”?  Jack said “They are icing the urinals!. 

 

And you thought E.E.s are a bunch of sober-sides.

 

 

 

Go To Greenburg “Seminar Shenanigans”, Page 2

 

A Transistor Museum™ History of Transistors Publication

COPYRIGHT © 2008 by Jack Ward.  All Rights Reserved.  http://www.transistormuseum.com/

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